Welcome

Are you worried that your child isn't developing like other children? Has your child been diagnosed with a developmental delay or disability? You are not alone. We are here to help you find answers to your questions. Other parents and therapists are here with you.

Senate Passes National Family Caregiver Support Program

Earlier this week, the Senate passed the Older Americans Act (OAA). This bill contains the eligibility fix for the national family caregiver support program that will now include older relative caregivers (aged 55 and over) of their adult children with disabilities (aged 18-59).

The National Family Caregiver Support Program was the first federal program to recognize the needs of the nation’s family caregivers who provide the vast majority of long-term services and supports. This program not only funds respite, but individual counseling, support groups, and caregiver training for family caregivers, primarily for those who are caring for the aging population.iStock_000013039002Small

With the increasing number of Americans who are caregivers of their adult children with disabilities, we are thrilled to see this improvement in the program. There are over 800,000 caregivers of persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) who are over the age of 60. This number is projected to grow substantially with the aging of the “baby boomer” generation. People with intellectual and developmental disabilities are also living longer due to medical advances. As parents of these individuals age, they will require more support to be able to continue providing care to their adult children and avoiding costly and unwanted institutional placement.

More than at any other time, when Medicaid, Medicare, and Social Security are being threatened, helping family caregivers to continue providing long-term services and supports is good public policy.

The National Family Caregiver Support Program and the Older Americans Act have been on our radar as they have direct impact for improving and securing a life with out limits for those living with disabilities and their families.

Call Your Member of Congress and tell them how thankful you are for the passage of the National Family Caregiver Support Program and the Older Americans Act!

To help guide your call, we have put together a list of talking points.

New Device Helping Infants with Disabilities Learn to Crawl

Image Description: New device helping infants with disabilitiesThe SIPPC (Self-Initiated Prone Progressive Crawler) is currently being used by doctors to understand brain patterns associated with movement to analyze how infants go about their decision-making process. The NSF-funded trial should be completed by the end of the year. Doctors continue to refine the design and apply it for children with various disabilities, including those who are visually-impaired. READ MORE.

What Can You Do to Protect Access and Independence?

Image Description: Young man, who happens to be in a wheelchair, ice skatingWhen it comes to paying for wheelchairs and other equipment, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) uses a program called ‘competitive bidding’.  Over the years, United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) has worked with the disability community to ensure that the competitive bidding process does not restrict reimbursement of the equipment necessary to live daily life with a disability. But a recent development has come up– and could drastically limit the payment for and access to much-needed tools and technology. Learn what YOU CAN DO